• When Your Child Needs You, Stand Up and Be Counted?

    Many of us know that children whose parents are actively involved in their school and other activities tend to more well-adjusted, happy and healthy than those whose parents are not. They also tend to excel in school, in play and other extracurricular activities.

    When Your Child Needs You, Stand Up and Be Counted?

    Helene Goldnadel believes that parents who get themselves involved motivate their children to do well in school. Such involvement enhances the child's cognitive development. It also fortifies the bond between parents and child. Parents in turn feel fulfilled from their parenting chores. The enhanced personal and academic progress of the child raises the parents' self-worth. The whole process is therefore mutually beneficial for both parent and child.

     

    So it comes to a point where parents need to ask how they may be able to productively help and get involved in their children's activities. Parents are hard pressed finding time for activities away from domestic chores, school, and work. Making quality time for extra involvement in children's activities is therefore a challenge. You need commitment and careful planning to be able to provide your child with whatever amount of support--given your availability--you can give him.

     

    There are lots of entry points where you can be of help to your child. Begin by knowing what interests him. You might, for example, think of joining a fundraising drive at your child's school, only to find out later that your child is more passionate about his scouting activities. When this happens, try to relate to and network with other Boy Scout parents for scouting-related activities.

     

    You may also think of skills, abilities and talents which you can contribute to the parent-child partnership. Do not force yourself to volunteer for an environmental advocacy campaign in your child's school for the sake of getting involved if this is not your cup of tea. You will not be happy with this work and your child will notice it. He will not be happy with it either. Instead ask around where your abilities might be of help to the school. The point is to make your involvement a truly positive experience for you and your child.

     

    Your getting involved can go a long way for your child. It gives him self-confidence, keeps him away from misbehaving or running into problems. The wonder of it is you also derive satisfaction and other emotional benefits from seeing your child in great shape.

     

    Also read: Basic Needs of Every Child Discussed by Helene Goldnadel


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